04 Oct 2012

The Makings of a Good Recruiter

04 Oct 2012

From our friends at the Sourcery, who we think have a great model — employers pay them by the hour for recruiting services, rather than a flat dollar amount or percentage of salary.  Last year, Allpointe used the Sourcery to post listings, screen resumes, check references, develop a questionnaire and make recommendations about the best “fit” for the two positions we needed (Operations Manager and Account Manager).  We were extremely pleased with Keely’s prompt, efficient service and a year later, continue to be happy with our new team members!

The Makings of a Good Recruiter

Value your candidates
There is an assumed imbalance of power in the relationship between recruiter and candidate.  The trick is to get both parties on the same page, and for the recruiter to remember they are in service to both the hiring company and the candidate. There are ways a recruiter can show a candidate they are valued, and give them reason to value the position.

  • Know who you’re talking to. This can mean a careful reading of the candidate’s resume, checking out past companies, or perusing their personal webpage, twitter, etc. This can take less than 10 minutes, but will allow you to personalize your conversation to make it more than just an interview or screen.
  • Turn the tables. The interview process can easily become a candidate selling him or herself to the recruiter. Recruiters shouldn’t hesitate to tout the benefits of working for the hiring company. Ask questions to discern what your candidate is looking for in a company and position, and tie their needs in with what said company can offer.
  • Follow up. While it’s easy to get caught up looking for the “winning” candidate, it doesn’t take much to send follow up messages to the “no” candidates. If for no other reason than professional courtesy, every candidate should be kept informed of their progress. The candidate who wasn’t right for one role, might be your next hire for another role. Or, the candidate you are ready to make a move on might accept another role because they didn’t know all of their options.

Respect the process
It was quite a shock when I first discovered that posting a job doesn’t mean you will fill a job. A job ad is only the first of many steps along the way, albeit an important one. The calibration process for sourcing candidates is essential, and requires patience on both ends. Most companies begin with a profile of what they think is their ideal candidate. A recruiter finds that ideal, presents it to the hiring manager, and the hiring manager realizes that ideal wasn’t exact. While it’s easy to become frustrated after speaking with multiple ill fitted potential employees, part of the process of figuring out what you want, is learning what you don’t want. So take a deep breathe, copious notes, and enjoy narrowing the pool.

Remember the real finish line
It’s easy to forget that there is one shared goal when it comes to filling a position. The hiring manager, recruiter and candidate should all be concerned with finding the right fit for the role. It is too easy for a recruiter to become more concerned with earning a fee or bonus, than achieving a successful long-term placement. The candidate opinion of recruiting agencies has fallen greatly, in part because more and more recruiting service agencies are filling roles quickly, and not always with the right people. Even when time is short, the goal is always to find the employee the best match possible.

Three simple steps to becoming a world class recruiter, this is not. But it is a good place to start when trying to figure out what you’re doing wrong. Also, there are too many hiring managers and recruiters out there who assume their methods are fine because it’s “what everyone does,” but again, that’s not always the case. Instead of getting in trapped in the mentality of recruiting one way because you think that’s the way it’s done, decide to recruit in a way that gets things done right.

Leave a comment
More Posts
Comments
Comment